Friday, September 19, 2014

 
ANGLER ACCESS
The Florida FWC will hold a public forum on the proposed zones Sept. 25 in the town of Treasure Island starting at 6 p.m.

CONSERVATION
Chesapeake Bay Program partners have opened new online avenues for individuals, watershed organizations, community groups and other interested parties to become more engaged in the conservation, restoration and protection of their rivers, landscapes and the Bay.
Scuttled in 75 feet of water eight miles out into the Gulf as part of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department's artificial reef program, the Kinta S is the largest ship to be reefed since the 473-foot Texas Clipper was sunk 17 miles off South Padre Island in 2006.
This month marks the one-year anniversary of a law passed by the 83rd Texas Legislature prohibiting the uprooting of seagrass with the propeller of a boat within the coastal waters of Texas.

EDITOR'S NOTE
Looking for a convenient, fast and economical way to get your company's message to the angling and boating public?

EVENTS
Are you looking for the easiest way to fillet a mess of fish? Whether you're an old hand in the outdoors or a greenhorn who's ready for some new adventures, you can learn some new tricks at the 2014 Oklahoma Wildlife Expo!

GRANTS
Eligible applicants include county and municipal governments in the 11 coastal counties, regional and state agencies (other than DNR) and state affiliated educational and research institutions.

INDUSTRY
Bill Lewis Outdoors announced today the re-hire of Richard Broadwell to be its National Sales Manager, responsible for coordinating sales with reps and accounts nationwide.
The Federation properties management team announces the appointment of Dollahon PR to assist with marketing communications for its affiliations operating under the federationangler.com umbrella, anchored by The Bass Federation (TBF).
Arctic Ice, manufacturer of high performance cooler panels is proud to partner with Jax Outdoor Gear at 1200 North College Avenue, Fort Collins, Co to bring their innovative product offerings to outdoorsmen and women in northeastern Colorado.
Islander Resort, a Guy Harvey Outpost was officially unveiled this week by Dr. Guy Harvey before a crowd of Islamorada village officials, civic leaders, media representatives and residents.
Fishing Tackle Retailer is pleased to announce that B.A.S.S. Senior Editor Ken Duke will become the next Managing Editor of FTR.

INVASIVE SPECIES
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents cited a Jefferson Parish resident for alleged illegal piranha possession violations on Sept. 14 in Harahan.

NEW PRODUCTS
Fishouflage's Performance Hoodie Series will be available in Full Pattern with comprehensive color appliqué, Accented Version in Black or Moss with Fishouflage appliqué, and in Ladies with brightly accented Lime, Black and Hot Pink.
Vicious introduces Yellow Moss and Blaze Orange to enhance vision and depth perception during low light periods.

NEW TECHNOLOGY
Just pair your smartphone with a goTenna device and communicate off-grid with those near you who also have a goTenna, anywhere on the planet, regardless of access to cell reception or wi-fi.

PADDLE SPORTS
The Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Office of Greenways & Trails designated an 8-mile stretch of the Steinhatchee River during the Taylor County Commission meeting on Sept. 16.

RESEARCH
A new species of extinct tilefish was recently discovered at Calvert Cliffs along the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay. This new tilefish is named "ereborensis" after "Erebor": the elvish name for the Lonely Mountain in J.R.R. Tolkien's legend The Hobbit.

STATES
Plenty of hunting, fishing, and other recreational opportunities are still available in north central Washington despite this summer's wildfires and mudslides.
Salmon fishing will close at the end of the day Friday off Westport and at the end of the day Sunday off Ilwaco, state fisheries managers announced today.
The public again this year is invited to purchase surplus salmon that has been harvested at Department of Natural Resources weirs around the state.
The Department of Natural Resources will offer free tours to the public and school groups this fall at the Boardman River Weir (in downtown Traverse City), the Little Manistee River Weir (in Manistee County) and the Platte River Weir (in Benzie County).

TELEVISION
Chad Hoover returns to the legendary Lake Guntersville with good friends, and HOOK1 Kayak Fishing Team members Ron Champion and Shane Philips.

TOURNAMENTS
The 2014 Walmart BFL season continues with five two-day super tournaments on Sept. 27-28. The Hoosier Division is headed to the Ohio River, the Michigan Division will take on Lake St. Clair, the North Carolina Division will convene on Lake Norman, the Ozark Division will fish Lake of the Ozarks and the Volunteer Division will fish at Watts Barr Lake.
The championship tournament is being held on Bays de Noc as part of a partnership between Pure Michigan and Bassmaster to promote the state as a top destination for anglers.

WORKSHOPS
Anglers will learn how to use artificial baits while fishing from Brevard's beaches for a wide variety of gamefish from three expert anglers: Mark Nichols, Paul MacInnis and Rodney Smith.

Alabama's Gentle Giants-Manatees Establish Seasonal Populations Outside Florida

By David Rainer
Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

(By Billy Pope) Manatee Project participants were able to locate a pair of male manatees in the Dog River area near Mobile Bay recently. The specially designed capture boat from Sea World with a removable transom was used to bring the 1,200-pound animal onboard to be measured and go through a series of health checks. The animals were fitted with a tag collar that fits just ahead of the fluke with a float and a radio transmitter.





Manatees have the reputation of being docile, slow-motion grazers that just ease along the warm waters of the Gulf Coast, hence the nickname "sea cow." That might hold true most of the time, but when researchers attempt to apply a tag, the gentle giants act more like cornered bulls.

Until recently, most people along the northern Gulf Coast thought manatee sightings were the result of animals that had gone astray from their normal haunts in central and south Florida.

Thanks to the work of the Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL) and Manatee Project Director Dr. Ruth Carmichael, those misconceptions are being revealed. A tagging program started in 2009 has yielded a great deal of evidence about the manatees that visit the northern Gulf Coast.

The most recent tagging effort happened recently under the combined efforts of the Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries (WFF) Division, DISL, the University of South Alabama, Sea to Shore Alliance, SeaWorld Orlando, University of Florida, Lucky Dog Aviation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-Daphne, DISL volunteers and interns. The use of a spotter plane was donated by Shrimp Basket Restaurants.

Carmichael said the Manatee Project started in 2007, and the first tagging occurred in 2009. The data gathered since has proven the animals spotted around Mobile Bay and its estuaries came there with a purpose.

"At one time, people thought the sightings to the west of Florida were accidental," Carmichael said. "I think the big take-home message, and the biggest fact we've discovered with our program, is that not only is it not accidental but that some are regular visitors. And we have some animals that come back year after year."

Carmichael said there is one very large female that visits Mobile Bay on a regular basis. That animal has spent five of the past seven summers in Alabama. She said some animals that the project follows will go to Florida in the winter. As soon as the temperature warms up, they come back and stay in Alabama until it gets too cold.

"That raises the question of what's home," she said. "For some of these animals, is home where you go to spend the winter or where you spend the bulk of the rest of the year? The northern Gulf may be more of a home. At the least, we are part of their home range.

"The important thing a lot of people don't realize is that we have fossil records of manatees in the northern Gulf. What I think is when populations declined that the population was so small there was no need or motivation to leave Florida. As recovery has been successful in Florida, I think we're seeing range expansion, or more accurately range re-expansion. Now there are enough animals that it is worth their while to come back and re-occupy areas suitable to them. We're not increasing habitat, so we're trying to recover with static habitat resources. So they have to go somewhere, a lot to times to places they had previously occupied."

Carmichael said the timing of the Manatee Project couldn't have come at a more appropriate time.

"We could be looking at a substantial range re-expansion and re-occupation," she said. "And I think we have, and probably by luck, captured the beginnings of the tipping point where we may see more animals come here and stay longer. And it may become very clear that not only is this part of their home range but our area will be increasingly occupied. But that remains to be seen. You can ask me again in a few years."

In terms of numbers of manatees that can be found in Alabama waters at any time during warmer weather, Carmichael said that is hard to pinpoint.

"That's a tough question," she said. "There are certain things we can prove. And there are certain things we can guesstimate. We have certain sightings of groups of animals in one area. Then we have sightings of individuals."

What makes it difficult, according to Carmichael, is some animals are coming to Mobile Bay to spend the summer, while others just spend some time in Mobile Bay on their way to other areas.

"During the peak of the season we maybe have at least two dozen animals in Alabama waters," she said. "The number that pass through are likely many, many more than that."

There have been four tagging events since 2009 with 13 animals captured. Twelve of those were tagged, although two of those animals were tagged twice.

During last week's tagging effort, two younger males were netted and carefully hauled aboard Sea World's specially equipped boat with a removable transom. Carmichael said one animal was estimated at 1,200 pounds, while the second was about 1,400 pounds. She said determining the age of a manatee is difficult once it passes a certain age.

"We can tell somewhat by how clean they are," she said. "These animals were very clean with not a lot of scars or marks, which means they are probably younger."

For someone observing their first manatee capture, it appeared to be a difficult task, especially when the animal's paddle-shaped tail (fluke) came in contact with the researchers and interns attempting to load the animal in the boat. However, Carmichael said that was not unusual.

"Both captures went pretty smoothly," she said. "It's like catching a really big fish. Think of the biggest fish you ever caught (100-pound yellowfin tuna) and multiply that by 10. Sometimes it's difficult to get them in the boat. The fact we were able to do it as quickly as we did is a testament to the skill of the folks involved in the capture. But every single event is different."

Once the manatee was on board, the marine scientists and researchers went to work. Respiration was monitored to determine if the animal was in distress. Then a full health assessment followed with blood drawn and fecal material sampled as well as a skin sample from the edge of the fluke. The length and girth measurements were recorded as well as any identifying marks on the animal. A tag, similar to a crab float, was attached to the fluke.

"Thankfully, none of our animals had any problems," Carmichael said. "Everything worked out well. They were released and swam away."

Carmichael said the Sea Lab supplies manatee habitat area signs free of charge to all coastal residents in Alabama and Mississippi.

Because there are relatively few manatees in Alabama waters, no-wake manatee zones have not been established.

"What I believe in is education," Carmichael said. "We believe in raising awareness, in letting people know these animals are here and when to expect to see manatees. We offer the free signage so people can put them up to make people aware that this is a habitat area; they can be cautious in case they do encounter an animal. I think we can do more with education than putting in restrictions.

"We've never had a mortality from a boat strike in Alabama."

Mark Sasser, Coordinator of WFF's Nongame Wildlife Program, said once it was determined there was a breeding population of manatees in Mobile Bay that WFF devoted a significant portion of its nongame budget to the manatee work.

"All states get a federal allocation each year for threatened and endangered species," said Sasser, who manned one of the support boats during the tagging event, along with WFF Nongame Biologist Roger Clay. "The manatee is an endangered species that has a great deal of interest. This species has a lot of support from the general public. A lot of what we do hinges on public acceptance.

"Folks like manatees. It's a lot easier to generate interest in manatees than in (Eastern) indigo snakes (another endangered species). Both are species worthy of recovery, but it's hard to convince people that we need more snakes. This manatee project has garnered quite a bit of public support. You could tell by the number of volunteers and interns. Even the folks who lived in the area where the animals were captured showed a great deal of interest in what was going on with the manatees."

Carmichael said the public interest was not that great when the Manatee Project started in 2007.

"We had an uphill battle in just getting people to report sightings," she said. "One of my goals is to be out explaining to people what we're doing, why we're doing it and why we care about these animals.

"Everybody who reports seeing one of these animals is part of our program, part of our network. We couldn't do it without people on the water who report the sightings and give us information."

Anyone who spots a manatee, please report the sighting 24-7 toll free at 1-866-493-5803, online at manatee.disl.org or via email to manatee@disl.org. A Facebook page is located at https://www.facebook.com/mobilemanatees.

The Fishing Wire welcomes your comments and actively solicits letters and guest editorials from readers as well as fishery managers, scientists and industry experts in boating, fishing and related equipment. Please send your comments and suggestions to frank@thefishingwire.com.
Outdoors Calendar

» Got an event you'd like to see posted here? Send it to frank@thefishingwire.com.

Apr. 1 - Nov. 30: New Jersey inshore saltwater fishing tournament. Eight species, over 50 weigh stations, $100,000 in cash & prizes for the largest catches. Proceeds to the Fisheries Conservation Trust. $FREE entry using The Fishing Wire Code: 3720; www.BeachNBoat.com or 609.423.4002.

Apr. 12 - Mar. 31: 2nd Annual Lund Boats LCI Champlain Basin Derby,
50 weeks, 15 species, $25,000! www.lciderby.com

Sept. 18 - Sept. 20: National Walleye Tour Championship at Lake Winnebago at Oshkosh, Wis.; www.nationalwalleyetour.com

Sept. 20 - Sept. 21: Mud Hole Custom Tackle's Rod Building 101 Class, Mobile, Ala., http://www.mudhole.com/Rod-Building-101/Classes or call (866) 790-7637 ext. 112.

Sept. 20 - Sept. 21: Mud Hole Custom Tackle's Rod Building 101 Class,. The Battle House Renaissance Mobile Hotel & Spa, Mobile, Ala.. http://www.mudhole.com/Rod-Building-101/Classes or call (866) 790-7637 ext. 112.

Sept. 20 - Sept. 21: Mud Hole Custom Tackle's Rod Building 101 Class,. The Battle House Renaissance Mobile Hotel & Spa, Mobile, Ala.. http://www.mudhole.com/Rod-Building-101/Classes or call (866) 790-7637 ext. 112.

Sept. 25 - Sept. 27: TrawlerFest, Harborview Marine Center, Baltimore; www.passagemaker.com.

Sept. 27 - Sept. 28: IFA Redfish and Kayak Tours at Sarasota, Fla.; www.ifatours.com

Oct. 11 - Oct. 12: Mud Hole Custom Tackle's Rod Building 101 Class, Minneapolis, Minn., http://www.mudhole.com/Rod-Building-101/Classes or call (866) 790-7637 ext. 112.

Oct. 11 - Oct. 12: Mud Hole Custom Tackle's Rod Building 101 Class, Minneapolis, Minn., http://www.mudhole.com/Rod-Building-101/Classes or call (866) 790-7637 ext. 112.

Oct. 11 - Oct. 12: Mud Hole Custom Tackle's Rod Building 101 Class. Minneapolis Marriott West, Minneapolis, Minn. http://www.mudhole.com/Rod-Building-101/Classes or call (866) 790-7637 ext. 112.

Oct. 17 - Oct. 18: IFA Kayak Championship at Houma, La.; www.ifatours.com

Oct. 17 - Oct. 19: Bisbee's Los Cabos Offshore Tournament, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. $750,000 in cash prizes. www.bisbees.com

Oct. 21 - Oct. 25: Bisbee's Black & Blue Marlin Tournament, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. $2.5 million-plus in cash prizes. www.bisbees.com

Oct. 24 - Oct. 25: IFA Redfish Championship at Houma, La.; www.ifatours.com

Nov. 1: Great Lakes Council IFFF, 15th Annual FLY TYING EXPO. 70 Demonstration tyers, programs, vendors, auction, raffle. Kids free. http://www.fffglc.org.

Nov. 7 - Nov. 8: International Bonefish & Tarpon Trust Symposium, IGFA headquarters, Dania Beach, Fla., public welcome; bob@bonefishtarpontrust.org.

Nov. 8 - Nov. 9: Mud Hole Custom Tackle's Rod Building 101 Class, San Francisco, Calif., http://www.mudhole.com/Rod-Building-101/Classes or call (866) 790-7637 ext. 112.





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