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The Great Jig & Minnow Migration In Bass Fishing

So there is a subtle movement in bass fishing right now that is picking up a lot of steam and honestly the nomenclature around it is getting to be a little nuts and just mudding the water so to speak.

So there is a subtle movement in bass fishing right now that is picking up a lot of steam and honestly the nomenclature around it is getting to be a little nuts and just mudding the water so to speak. But the jig and minnow bass fishing soft plastics and forward facing sonar effectiveness is undeniable now. And more and more big events are getting won now with what most of us old timers would call a crappie jig.

But guys are calling it everything from Damiki Rigging, Moping, now Cindy Rigging, and just plain-old Crappie Jigging. So I am going to shed a bunch of light on it and make several cases for why it’s becoming the norm in bass fishing especially in competitive fishing circles. And I’m going to reference a lot of history and past pieces and fishing tournaments as well as ones that just happened a week or two ago to explain it all as succinctly and make the case for why you need to hone your skills with these finesse jig and minnow options.

damiki rig original jig and minnow for bass in the winter
The Great Jig & Minnow Migration In Bass Fishing 1

Damiki Rigging history

I was keyed into the Damiki Rig back in 2012 or 2013. I had fished with some guys on highland reservoir impoundments who were mopping up fish just vertical fishing with small plastics on a ball head. The rig was deemed the Damiki Rig because Damiki made the best and pretty much only little plastic, the Damiki Armor Shad, that the smallmouth and spotted bass on these clear fisheries wanted to eat with any regularity in the winter.

As the water got colder and the bite got tougher, the Damiki rig seemed to catch them better. What was different about it was that you just dropped the bait down on 2D sonar and sort of held it there. Maybe you would lift it slowly and let it back down slowly or just shake it in place a little, but usually that was just to get a fish that had eased up that you saw on sonar to do more than just look at it.

It was a do-nothing approach that fit the ultra-slow metabolisms of winter bass in deeper water. And it was a great way to catch a variety of fish just straight up and down vertical fishing.

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